Witnessed some stellar #museumtheater courtesy of @dogandponydc yesterday! #HiveDC 🐝

@taylorkhorst

Grateful to have the opportunity to observe and work with the amazing Rachel Grossman and the dog & pony dc crew.

Jill Bradbury, Professor, Department of English at Gallaudet University

One of the best performative experiences I’ve had thus far.

Caitlin C., audience member regarding SEVEN AGES: YOUR LIFE THROUGH THE SENSES

…’A Killing Game’ is in part a lab experiment: By what means and to what degree can theater make use of an audience as a creative force? Unlike some ‘interactive’ events, in which actors jump off the stage and sit in playgoers’ laps or dragoon a spectator or two onto the stage for an anxious cameo in a short skit, ‘A Killing Game’ tries, with more trust in its customers, to upend the us-and-them aspect of theatergoing. It’s as if the troupe were saying, ‘Hey: Uncross your arms! We’re all on the same side!
–The Washington Post, July 21 2013

Peter Marks, reviewing for The Washington Post

You know a performance is good when all the crazy, seemingly out-­of-­control moving parts add up to an infectious entertainment experience.
-City Beat, May 31 2013

Joe Gorman, reviewing for City Beat

Sometimes you walk into a theater and by the time you get to your seat, you just know you’re going to have a good time…A Killing Game is tight and sharp…zippy and chaotic and manages to be both cynical and optimistic.
–The Cincinnati Enquirer, June 3 2013

David Lyman, reviewing for The Cincinnati Enquirer

You won’t find Beertown on any map, but you’ll find the town’s essence in your heart as you struggle to figure out what items best tell your own story, and realize that memories change slightly each time you remember something, usually a result of twisting some of the details to create a supposedly better narrative. What starts out as a fun stay in a quirky little town ends up being surprisingly emotional.
–The News Record, March 9, 2016

Stephanie L. Smith, reviewing for The News Record

Think you’re too sophisticated to play along with an interactive theater company? Well, think again. The clever folks at Dog & Pony DC have collectively devised a theater piece about a small, fictional Midwestern town, and it requires much audience interaction. The result is so gently satiric and utterly involving that you’ll find yourself voting for and against issues before you even realize you’ve raised your hand.
–The Washington Post, November 14, 2011

Jane Horwitz, reviewing for The Washington Post

You all have hit upon a mode of development and production that successfully fosters a wide range of community dialogues about the nature of arts, culture, and society in a way that is thought-provoking, emotionally moving, and incredibly immersive.

David D. LaCroix, Ph.D., science and technology collaborator on Toast

We are delighted dog & pony dc has committed itself to the advocacy and support of Deaf talent, artists, and audiences. Progress is seeing an ensemble of Deaf and hearing actors work as equals, with the Deaf actors free from meeting any pre-set criteria mandating that their characters be Deaf…instead of being reduced to novelties and/or tokens.

Ethan Sinnott, Program Director, Theatre and Dance; Associate Professor, Theatre, Gallaudet University