We are dog & pony dc, and we seek to reposition non-profit theatre companies in D.C. and across the country to be in service to their audiences and communities.

We’re a devised theatre ensemble. We create (“devise”) new plays and interactive experiences as a collective (“ensemble”) of hearing and Deaf artists.

We believe in the power of collaboration, between artists and with the audience.

We’re pro-innovation. We recognize innovation requires structure, chaos, and a leap of faith, so our process embraces them.

We approach all our work with a healthy mix of playfulness and generosity, as we believe that amplifies the impact of our work.

You complete us.

You know a performance is good when all the crazy, seemingly out-­of-­control moving parts add up to an infectious entertainment experience.
-City Beat, May 31 2013

Joe Gorman, reviewing for City Beat

dog & pony dc posits theatre as an artistic democracy in which the actors serve as guides establishing the rules of play, but largely lets the audience fill in the details of the world of the show.

Shannon Davies Mancus, former ensemble member

We are delighted dog & pony dc has committed itself to the advocacy and support of Deaf talent, artists, and audiences. Progress is seeing an ensemble of Deaf and hearing actors work as equals, with the Deaf actors free from meeting any pre-set criteria mandating that their characters be Deaf…instead of being reduced to novelties and/or tokens.

Ethan Sinnott, Program Director, Theatre and Dance; Associate Professor, Theatre, Gallaudet University

…’A Killing Game’ is in part a lab experiment: By what means and to what degree can theater make use of an audience as a creative force? Unlike some ‘interactive’ events, in which actors jump off the stage and sit in playgoers’ laps or dragoon a spectator or two onto the stage for an anxious cameo in a short skit, ‘A Killing Game’ tries, with more trust in its customers, to upend the us-and-them aspect of theatergoing. It’s as if the troupe were saying, ‘Hey: Uncross your arms! We’re all on the same side!
–The Washington Post, July 21 2013

Peter Marks, reviewing for The Washington Post

Think you’re too sophisticated to play along with an interactive theater company? Well, think again. The clever folks at Dog & Pony DC have collectively devised a theater piece about a small, fictional Midwestern town, and it requires much audience interaction. The result is so gently satiric and utterly involving that you’ll find yourself voting for and against issues before you even realize you’ve raised your hand.
–The Washington Post, November 14, 2011

Jane Horwitz, reviewing for The Washington Post