We are dog & pony dc.

We believe in the power of collaboration, between artists and with the audience.

We’re pro-innovation and taking necessary leaps of faith.

We believe playfulness and generosity amplifies the impact of our work.

We seek to upend the way non-profit theatre is made and consumed, repositioning it in service to its audience and community

You complete us.

You all have hit upon a mode of development and production that successfully fosters a wide range of community dialogues about the nature of arts, culture, and society in a way that is thought-provoking, emotionally moving, and incredibly immersive.

David D. LaCroix, Ph.D., science and technology collaborator on Toast

We appreciate dog & pony dc’s high artistic standards and aspiration to change the audience’s perception of its role in a theatrical experience.

Jill Strachan, Executive Director, Capital Hill Arts Workshop

I felt valued as an audience member, I felt committed to the the rest of the audience and the cast, and I felt like I had experienced something I could ONLY have experienced in that room, on that night – how cool! That’s not an experience you get anywhere else!

Johanna Middleton, audience member

Night in and night out, participating with dog & pony dc was a draining, fulfilling, exhausting, stimulating, frightening, rewarding, endearing, emboldening, emotional, beautiful experience…I can only hope that many others will have the privilege to partner with them as I did, because the incredibly lovely people that make up their company seem to leave nothing but love, growth, and positive change in their wake.

Melissa King, actor

Think you’re too sophisticated to play along with an interactive theater company? Well, think again. The clever folks at Dog & Pony DC have collectively devised a theater piece about a small, fictional Midwestern town, and it requires much audience interaction. The result is so gently satiric and utterly involving that you’ll find yourself voting for and against issues before you even realize you’ve raised your hand.
–The Washington Post, November 14, 2011

Jane Horwitz, reviewing for The Washington Post